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Google Forms - Choose Your Own Adventure - My First Attempt



I just created my first Choose Your Own Adventure style story using Google Forms. As a tech coach that deals primarily with elementary school students I would definitely put this in a Gifted and Talented category...at the end of the year...as enrichment (it was kind of hard!).

I found the video above the best as far as instructions go on YouTube. I didn't have to watch the whole thing...I got the general gist by the 8 minute mark.

I liked her flow chart and used the Smart Art Hierarchy Tool to make mine (the teacher in this video used Google Drawings). I thought the Smart Art tool would be easier (since it provides a template) but I'm not sure it is (I would need to try it). Student might find that step too much and might be better off sketching their story out on paper or using numbered index cards. The teacher in the video had 16 levels to her story...I had 17 (if you count the ending...it is 18). That was a lot!



My flow chart was sketch of story and how it would flow from decision point to decision point..knowing I would add to it when I actually got down to the final writing in Google Forms. I am not sure students could handle that (I ran out of space in my boxes for anything other then a rough outline). It did keep me super organized though. Students definitely can't go straight into making the form without some kind of guide (I tried at first and started getting confused at the decision points). 

I used a common story as my starting point (Cinderella). I modified it to fit my 17 levels (so no shoe left behind or fairy godmother in my story). That was still tricky...trying to fit in a story in basically 5 levels.

I kept mine blissfully short for my first trial and added clip art to make the levels more engaging. 

I definitely think this might be a solid week project with students...as in the last week of school??? I plan to share it next year but with the note that it might not be for everyone. 

Here is a link to my first try at a Choose Your Own Adventure story.  



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